Punch-marked coins are a type of early Coinage of India, dating to between about the 6th and 2nd centuries BCE.The first coins in India were minted around the 6th century BCE by the Mahajanapadas of the Indo-Gangetic Plain, and certainly before the invasion of Alexander the Great in the 4th century BCE.

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Knives were a common barter item in ancient China, but a bit hazardous to carry around to trade.

Some of China's first coins were made to look like a knife, so that people would think of them as money, but they lacked a sharp blade. This knife coin is called the "Ming" after the city where it was made (not the dynasty that was much later). It is made of bronze and is about 5 inches (13cm.) long.

Electrum was used as early as the third millennium BCE in Old Kingdom of Egypt, sometimes as an exterior coating to the pyramidions atop ancient Egyptian pyramids and obelisks.

It was also used in the making of ancient drinking vessels.

Coins provide not only evidence of art and economy, but also a wisdom for understanding the history and politics of a nation.

As a means of communication, they speak to the political and religious ideologies that underpinned a ruler's or state's claim to power.

The coins of this period were punch-marked coins called Puranas, Karshapanas or Pana.

Several of these coins had a single symbol, for example, Saurashtra had a humped bull, and Dakshin Panchala had a Swastika, others, like Magadha, had several symbols.

The Tang Dynasty was a brilliant period in Chinese history. The K'ai Yuan coin continued to be issued for the next 300 years, until the collapse of the Dynasty in 907AD.