A stunning 20% of people who told Career Builder that they had dated someone at the office admitted that at least one person in the relationship was married.

And a whopping 31% of office relationships result in marriage—meaning they can't always be a bad idea, right?

Here's how to make sure pursuing love won't cost you your job: Avoid Getting Involved with the Wrong Person According to the Career Builder survey, 24% of intra-office relationships were with someone higher up in the organization.

After firing CEO Dov Charney last month, American Apparel decided to update its company code of ethics with stricter guidelines regarding interoffice relationships.

According to the new policy, “No management-level employee may make sexual advances, welcome or unwelcome, toward any subordinate.”Considering Charney’s time with the company was riddled with allegations of sexual harassment, it’s no surprise that the company wants to take a more conservative approach to fraternization.

If nobody seems to notice, there's no reason to share. You and your new partner need to agree on some ground rules and come up with a plan for how you will keep it professional and stay within written or unwritten rules. "You may have the burden of overcompensating with professionalism and keeping an artificial distance, which can be an awkward strain," says Taylor.

"What will be your plan 'B' if the heat is on from a supervisor, from gossip, or if things go awry? "Better to overcompensate than to constantly test the limits of workplace etiquette while hoping for the best." Be sensitive and respectful to others.Before you risk hurting your reputation at work, find out if this person is someone you'd want to spend weekends with. People either don't care, will think it's obnoxious or inappropriate, or will get jealous. Once you have a sense that this might have a future, talk to your partner and decide how and when you want to disclose your relationships to your colleagues.If the rumor mill goes into high gear, that might be the right time.You may have already seen how he or she handles stress and treats peers.There’s also a good chance that, working for the same employer, the two of you enjoy similar work hours and holidays. Will dating someone at work change the way co-workers or supervisors regard you?Is this something we have to bring up with our boss? Thanks, BG Dear BG: It is not surprising that you have gotten into a relationship with someone at work.