When Noah Leavitt and Helen Kim first met and started dating in graduate school in 1997, they didn’t know many other couples that looked like them.

Fast forward a decade, and the Jewish-American Leavitt and the Korean-American Kim, by then married and soon to become parents to the first of their two children, started to notice that not a week went by without at least one Asian-Jewish couple appearing in the New York Times wedding announcements section.

And it deepened over the next four years despite being on opposite sides of the country, he out at Stanford, I at Western Michigan.

People sometimes ask us, why didn’t you date sooner, wasn’t love in the air?

He and I bonded over China one evening at the gym, and pretty soon we went from lifting weights to lifting coffee cups over at the Starbucks just down the street from me. Kaifeng became home to a community Sephardic Jews during the Northern Song Dynasty, and they thrived there for more than 700 years.

I liked Arnold because he was this huge espresso shot of an African-American, the kind of guy who wasn’t afraid to say — or ask — anything. Jews found refuge during the Holocaust in a visa-free Shanghai.

Oh, and in the “So Long, Farewell” number, we got to put on fancy clothes and sing “Goodbye! Our friendship began, developed, and thrived while we acted and sang over the course of those four years.

It continued as each of us dated our own high school sweethearts.

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Sometimes, when the world seems crazy out there, we all get that inside voice going.

Subjectivity informs our questions, and this is not seen as a negative at all,” Kim told The Times of Israel about the couple’s decision to embark on a seven-year-long study that would fill the evident void and culminate in their recently published, “Jew Asian: Race, Religion, and Identity for America’s Newest Jews.” A work with a strong academic underpinning, “Jew Asian” is at the same time accessible to all readers interested in how Jewish-Asian couples and their families fit into broader contexts of multiracial identity and religiosity in the United States, as well as of intermarriage historically.