It's a question that is regularly asked, but not always accurately answered.It confuses, perplexes, and even angers both Christians and non-Christians alike.But some moments spin out of control before we even open our mouths to respond.

is dating an unbeliever sin-21

Perfect in the sense that he was almost exactly like me, we liked the same things, had the same tastes, he knew what kind of stuff I would like, we even supported the same football team… All except for the fact that he wasn't a Christian.

It didn't matter to me at first, but I think all along at the back of my mind, I knew it would be an issue someday.

Everyone (including myself, sometimes) thought I was nuts and couldn't for the life of them understand it.

I'm not sure he did either, and for that I am the most sorry.

Something so good, is so bad cause I’ve dedicated my life to Christ and my bf has chosen his own path. If you know someone who is in a committed relationship of which you do not approve, an excellent question to ask yourself—especially before venturing to offer any opinion on that relationship—is whether or not anyone but you gives a rolled-up church bulletin what you think of that relationship.

Dear Christians who make a point of letting their Christian friends who are in serious relationships with non-Christians know that they think it’s wrong for a Christian to date or marry a non-Christian: If I ever meet you, I am going to beat you up. More importantly, does anyone actually you’re a Christian, and be quiet about it? Offering unsolicited critical opinions of others makes you a toxic gossip, which is one of the lowest things anyone can be.

An idol is something that is held in higher esteem than God.

Since an unbeliever doesn't believe in God, to him everything is an idol, including his relationship with you.

A "yoke" was a farm implement that bound two animals together so that they could work together as a team.

Modern translations remove the "yoke" and translate the intent of the verse, warning believers, "Do not be bound together with unbelievers." Does this apply to marriage?

It sounds elitist, holier-than-thou, and downright condescending. I'm 28 this year, I'm single, and one of the most common things I hear from my friends goes something along the lines of: "Why so picky? If your standard not so high I would introduce you to my friend(s) already la." And while I wholly believe in their well-meant intentions, I think it’s about time someone explained the reason behind this "pickiness", lest it be classified as another irrational, snobbish Christian standard to live by.