So before I do the merge() I verified that Image() had been set.

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Say you have a column id which keeps your ID and version which keeps the version. So if the update statement returns 0, hibernate knows that the row is deleted or updated by another transaction.

Using optimistic locking does an update like this "..., version = ?

There would be one table corresponding to each object you are willing to provide persistence.

Consider above objects need to be stored and retrieved into the following RDBMS table: There are other attributes and elements available which will be used in a mapping document and I would try to cover as many as possible while discussing other Hibernate related topics.

Stock stock = new Stock(); Stock Daily Record stock Daily Records = new Stock Daily Record(); //set the stock and stock Daily Records data stock Daily Stock(stock); Stock Daily Records().add(stock Daily Records); session.save(stock); session.save(stock Daily Records); Hibernate: insert into mkyong.stock (STOCK_CODE, STOCK_NAME) values (? ) Hibernate: insert into mkyong.stock_daily_record (STOCK_ID, PRICE_OPEN, PRICE_CLOSE, PRICE_CHANGE, VOLUME, DATE) values (? Both are totally different notions, see the differential here.

) Stock stock = new Stock(); Stock Daily Record stock Daily Records = new Stock Daily Record(); //set the stock and stock Daily Records data stock Daily Stock(stock); Stock Daily Records().add(stock Daily Records); session.save(stock); Hibernate: insert into mkyong.stock (STOCK_CODE, STOCK_NAME) values (? ) Hibernate: insert into mkyong.stock_daily_record (STOCK_ID, PRICE_OPEN, PRICE_CLOSE, PRICE_CHANGE, VOLUME, DATE) values (? How about if you just want to delete two referenced ‘stock Daily Records’ records? You need to delete the ‘stock Daily Records’ one by one.

I was just having an issue with my hibernation in Linux Mint 17 Cinnamon and came across this link.

The “Cascade” keyword is often appear on the collection mapping to manage the state of the collection automatically. Stock Daily Record sdr1 = (Stock Daily Record)session.get(Stock Daily Record.class, new Integer(56)); Stock Daily Record sdr2 = (Stock Daily Record)session.get(Stock Daily Record.class, new Integer(57)); session.delete(sdr1); session.delete(sdr2); The cascade=”delete-orphan” is declared in ‘stock Daily Records’ to enable the delete orphan cascade effect.

In this tutorials, this one-to-many example will be used to demonstrate the cascade effect. When you save or update the Stock, it will remove those ‘stock Daily Records’ which already mark as removed.

In this example, if a ‘Stock’ is saved, all its referenced ‘stock Daily Records’ should be saved into database as well. Stock Daily Record sdr1 = (Stock Daily Record)session.get(Stock Daily Record.class, new Integer(56)); Stock Daily Record sdr2 = (Stock Daily Record)session.get(Stock Daily Record.class, new Integer(57)); Stock stock = (Stock)session.get(Stock.class, new Integer(2)); Stock Daily Records().remove(sdr1); Stock Daily Records().remove(sdr2); Or Update(stock); Further study – Cascade – JPA & Hibernate annotation common mistake.

A POJO (Plain Old Java Object) is a Java object that doesn't extend or implement some specialized classes and interfaces respectively required by the EJB framework. When you design a class to be persisted by Hibernate, it's important to provide Java Beans compliant code as well as one attribute which would work as index like id attribute in the Employee class.