Couples usually met each other ON the day of the wedding .This was a very well known tradition among well known nobilities.

dating and marriage in the elizabethan era-90dating and marriage in the elizabethan era-43dating and marriage in the elizabethan era-14

The chief difference between then and today, is that back then the woman possessed very little right in choosing her husband.

The matrimony was arranged by families of the bride and the groom in order for the two sides to benefit from one another.

Courtship, the very concept was derived from the Elizabethan era where the ladies of the court were wooed and won by knights and lords of the court through gestures such as of frequent visits, gifts and compliments.

The man generally asked a woman's father for permission to court his daughter, that implied that the man was seriously and openly desiring the responsibility of marriage.

While you didn’t, technically, have to get married if you were a woman…

there were these exciting bonuses to the wedded state: With this in mind, the act of getting betrothed weighed heavily on the hearts of Elizabethan women, and several of their customs live on today.

For example, the act of a betrothal was typically sealed with a kiss.

A betrothal ring was not always exchanged, but the custom did gain popularity in Elizabethan times.

This was especially true at the end of the 16th century, when a growing population and a succession of meagre harvests sharply increased the numbers of poor people needing relief.

Many men and women in the middle and upper ranks of society married for the first time with the help of bequests or lifetime transfers of resources from the previous generation.

This was rampant among lofty nobility, however people in the lower class would normally arranged the marriage with the children of friends and neighbors.