Monogomy has long been the most popular way to conduct a sexual relationship in our culture, yet some anthropologists think that polygamy has actually been the norm though human history.This may explain why as a society, we often aspire to be monogamous, putting fidelity on a pedestal, but then aren’t always that good at it in practice.

Prior to meeting her current boyfriend, Wendy met a lot of frogs — and we do mean a ($11). ) the number of dates she went on in the name of dating research (not unlike fellow author Melissa Pimentel), we think it’s fairly safe to say she’s something of an expert on modern-day dating and the apps that frequently accompany it.

Read on to find out which ones she was a fan of and which ones she says you should “swipe left” on. String: This newcomer to the scene promises to match you on a deeper level based on a list of 36 questions that studies say accelerate intimacy between two strangers and foster a “mutual vulnerability.” Pros: With availability currently limited to the San Francisco Bay area, it may be too soon to tell, although she says the questions can be a fun/cute game to play.

” Wendy says most of these are wishful thinking, fantasy, or “get-to-know” you questions as opposed to deep, meaningful ones. Tinder: The release of Tinder more or less turned online dating on its ear with its swipe-n-go, lightning-strike approach to online dating.

Originally viewed as a “hookup site,” the app shows users nothing more than a profile picture, age, interest and, more recently, education and job status before asking them to swipe right (thumbs up) or left (thumbs down). “It gets people off the couch.” What’s more, Wendy says it’s very male-friendly.

Cons: At a cursory glance, Wendy says that sadly, “a fun game” is about all these questions are good for — they aren’t deep enough to offer real insight to the human psyche. Citing queries like, “before making a telephone call, do you ever rehearse what you are going to say/why?

“[They’re] fake compatibility questions,” she says. For those that truly seek to be matched by compatibility, she says you have to look at the questions through the filters of “how can I best connect to someone and connect to a husband/wife [or] partner? ” and “Given the choice of anyone in the world, who would you want as a dinner guest?I found plenty of nice and friendly people, happy to connect and generous to share ideas and experiences.I got advice on relationship issues, information about meetings and events, new contacts, book and film recommendations, I have even got some guidance on DIY work.It’s a bit tougher for you regional members of our Australian polyamorous community to find a poly relationship or lover.Check out Poly Fi, “an online community for polyamorous folk in regional Australia” published by Polyamory Resources Australia (Poly Oz).For some couples, giving their partner permission to act out their sexual desires with other people feels like a more honest and realistic option.